Our Overdose

“In 2016, Summit County had 312 drug deaths, according to Gary Guenther, the county medical examiner’s chief investigator — a 46 percent increase from 2015 and more than triple the 99 cases that went through the medical examiner’s office just two years before. There were so many last year, Mr. Guenther said, that on three separate occasions the county had to request refrigerated trailers to store the bodies because they’d run out of space in the morgue.”
Drug Deaths in America Are Rising Faster Than Ever, NYT

 

These are sad times. The rates of overdoses are making national news in the United States. In fact it looks as though last year, for the first time, a drug overdose had become the number one killer of people under 50. We need to spend a moment with this fact, contemplate it, allow it to affect us. People in our country are seriously hurting. Personally, I manage to get by with a little coffee and pot which is hardly harmless but rather lightweight. I consider myself lucky since these stand in stark contrast to the dangers the opioid drugs (or hard drinking) present. “Heroin is the devil’s drug. It is,” Cliff Parker states in the NYT article and there certainly is a path of destruction around the use of these opioids derived from the heroin family. The morphine like effects of the opioids are what medics in war zones use to treat the wounded in triage conditions of a bloody battlefield filled with severed limbs. These molecules have the ability to remove, temporarily, the hurt and suffering the mind-body experiences when it is traumatized physically, emotionally or psychologically. They also can be used to keep those who traumatize others going, drowning their painful conscience, as the many morphine addicts among the Nazi SS attests.

It is not hard to understand where the pain behind today’s headline is coming from. We human beings were created to create; to mold our lives in the real world closer to the images of our individuality. It is this expression of will in the circumstances of our daily lives that determines the degree of happiness we experience. It is already hard to make this happen. To mold the real world into one that is just a little safer for ourselves and our loved ones, with needed resources more or less secured, is one of the main reasons we older adults get up in the morning. But it is hard. The struggle against the stubborn elements from wood to concrete, the ceaseless push to get ahead within social norms ruled by competition, and the fight against the demons within born of the abuses and traumas we have suffered, all this and more adds up to what is very often an extremely difficult day.

The ability of adults to effectively improve their circumstances is exactly what was assaulted with the shrinking of the middle class and wealth dictating legislation. Today we live under a historic degree of separation between the haves and the have nots where income inequality removes the ability of millions of adults to have a positive effect on their own immediate environments. Under these days of hyper-capitalism unbound the sweep of giant corporate interests has buried the mom and pop stores, and with them they are now burying mom and pop.

Humans want to make the world a little better than the way they found it. Not just in art, dreams, movies or books but out in the everyday places too. The homes we live in, the parks we walk through, the tasks we work at, the conversations we have; all can benefit from a touch of our enthusiasm, an extension of our kindness, and the courage to dare to hope that our efforts might make a difference. A home can be quite poor and yet clean in a way the most expensive penthouse suite will never be. There is a quality of the aesthetic sense nourished by the integrity of true beauty involved when real individuality is lead by the heart to express itself through its psychological and physical environments. This nourishing element cannot be bought at any price, though it does not exist wholly separate from the goods that are purchased, bartered for or otherwise acquired. The beauty cannot dwell in objects stolen from others, particularly objects stolen from the poor.

In a time of mass markets there is very little space in which individual creativity can be expressed. Households no longer produce any of the things they need, many don’t even prepare meals. Though it is so much easier to just shop for whatever it is the home needs, this has removed the avenue by which the previous generations contributed directly to the improvement of our environment (not to mention providing inter-generational family roots). Instead of occupying our time working at things that are needed to sustain our daily lives, we spend time on the job laboring for this or that corporation (assuming there is a job to be had). There is no security on this path, no retirement or medical benefits assured for the majority of people in this country of minimal social safety nets (all of which are under attack and unlikely to be funded as the times get harder all around). A lifetime of work for corporations leaves many people little more than paupers, barely able to take care of themselves, let alone leave anything substantial for future generations.

And then there is the truth of just what that corporate job entails. Each day we drive to and from work we add to the air pollution that is creating a nightmare for our children. The work we do is, more likely than not, harming the earth. The more successful the company we work for, the more harm its side effects inflict on ecosystems and people harried and harassed by constant sales appeals. Then we get home and find our communication with the rest of our community in our mailbox; a handful of bills and every other piece of a tree being used to push a bit of crafty salesmanship carrying psychological manipulations designed to bypass our reason and appeal directly to our emotions for sake of making more profits for strangers. Billboards, and banner ads, commercials and PR news and documentaries complete our creation of an environment ruled by cheating, deceptions, half-truths and lies packaged to manipulate each other’s love and fear. Some days we attend a funeral, some days we attend a wedding. Either way its hard to shake the feeling that these individual lives are just so many credit card numbers to those in control of the commanding heights. Consumers have no faces. We as a society have overdosed on markets.

Suffering people turn to religion or psychology for succor. Today the church or cult they encounter is more likely than not to be colored by the apocalyptic fear the death camps and nuclear bombs of recent history have left us all to struggle with. When it comes to religion there is a choice to be made. It can be used to teach and encourage individuality within a spirit of humility or used to enslave others through the manipulations of their loves and fears. Hard to say which is more common but there is sure an ominous development underway among those holding the world view of fanatic fundamentalists. Enslavement through the magical thinking of infantilization is all the rage among those peddling true believer certainty. Those too secular for religion turn to psychology, though it is far too costly for many people, particularly those who need it most. Those that do avail themselves of our Soul Doctor’s services may or may not find a practioner capable of assisting healing someone else instead of simply adding to their own self aggrandizement. There are real healing waters to be found in religions and psychologies, even today, but the crust of selfishness and the poison of corruption have left these institutions and traditions quite a bit worse for the wear. Churches full of pedophiles and abuses do not hold the light we need in this time of darkening ecological realities. Doctors beholden to profits above people are unable to heal the loss of soul so many are suffering from in this time of darkening ecological realities.

Let us salute those who fall on the battlefield of our times. They are casualties of the war between meaningful and meaningless lives, these soldiers with the broken arms as Bowie once dubbed them. With our salute let us renew our commitment to sanity. Look at these things and learn the power of respect for the pain of our fellow countrymen and woman, then let us move among the wounded in skillful acts of triage. We need to keep alive who we can, comforting family and loved ones as we might.

Of course there are some people who are quite sure those dying from these overdoses are simply scum, or sinners, or weak willed, or, well just about anything but the abused child now grown up but still unhealed they most likely are. ‘Chin up, buck up, and get on with things’ their well meaning advice runs, and it is good advice too, but it is too easily given. It fails to appreciate the difference between the un-traumatized nervous system they enjoy and the world it reports, and those whose have been less fortunate. Or they have yet to encounter their own traumatized parts and so project them onto others, perfecting their blindness. Then they are able to pretend they see no issues with mankind’s unsustainable rabid exploitation of earth and her inhabitants, only a holy war between the saved (themselves) and the damned (anything that stands in their way). They have yet to even achieve the first spiritual step of being pained by the truth.

Respect who and what you are as a human being by seeking what is real and refusing to fear phantoms. If somehow you avoided the needle and avoided slavery to holy books and avoided the allure of glitzy fame or big money status, and still have a heart filled with compassion – you are needed in the ranks of the protectors. If we can begin to articulate, even just to ourselves, the full dimensions of what we are involved in by being alive in our times, we will be able to over come the frozen-by-fear reaction that only finds comfort in the easement of pain through opioid addiction and its tragic return, as opposed to celebrated return, to the peace of death’s painlessness.

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